Look how beautiful the Earth is in the photos of the United States Geological Survey

Look how beautiful the Earth is in the photos of the United States Geological Survey

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On Earth Day 2022, in addition to our collection of articles about the Earth's ecology and climate, we share with you a selection of photos of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), which serves the people in the US and all over the world by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth. Look how beautiful the planet is and get the weather forecast for this or that place right on the Windy.app site.

Ust'-Lenskiy Zapovednik, Siberia

The Lena River, some 2,800 miles (4,500 km) long, is one of the largest rivers in the world. The Lena Delta Reserve is the most extensive protected wilderness area in Russia. It is an important refuge and breeding grounds for many species of Siberian wildlife.

Get the weather forecast for Novosibirsk, Siberia

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Western China

When landmasses collide, rock layers can break. Geologists call these breaks "faults." Rock layers are offset in this image in western China, making the faults remarkably clear. The different colors indicate rocks that formed at different times and in different environments.

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The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Himalaya Mountains, Southwestern China

Soaring, snow-capped peaks and ridges of the eastern Himalaya Mountains create an irregular white-on-red patchwork between major rivers in southwestern China. The Himalayas are made up of three parallel mountain ranges that together extend more than 2,900 kilometers.

Get the weather forecast for Mount Everest, Nepal

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Rio Negro, Brazil

Fed by multiple waterways, Brazil's Negro River is the Amazon River's largest tributary. The mosaic of partially-submerged islands visible in the channel disappears when rainy season downpours raise the water level.

Get the weather forecast for Manaus, Brazil

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Baffin Bay, Greenland

Along Greenland’s western coast, a small field of glaciers surrounds Baffin Bay.

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The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Vavilov Ice Cap, Arctic Ocean

One glacier on Russian islands in the Arctic Ocean surprised scientists with its rapid change. After decades of normal, slow movement, a glacier draining Vavilov Ice Cap sprang forward, accelerating rapidly after 2013. This fast movement is extremely rare for cold-based glaciers. In 5 years, the ice tongue doubled in size. In this inverted rendition, land is blue and fractured sea ice appears tan across the top of the image.

Get the weather forecast for Sabetta, Russia 

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Eyjafjörður, Iceland

This stretch of Iceland's northern coast resembles a tiger's head complete with stripes of orange, black, and white. The tiger's mouth is the great Eyjafjorour, a deep fjord that juts into the mainland between steep mountains. The name means "island fjord," derived from the tiny, tear-shaped Hrisey Island near its mouth. The ice-free port city of Akureyri lies near the fjord's narrow tip, and is Iceland's second largest population center after the capital, Reykjavik. 

Get the weather forecast for Reykjavik, Iceland

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Foxe Basin, Nunavut, Canada

Appearing as if an artist imitating Jackson Pollock had randomly spurted ink onto the canvas, this image shows swirling ice in the Foxe Basin of northern Canada. Even though the image is from late July, there was still ice floating in the water this far north.

Get the weather forecast for Cape Dorset, Canada

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Turpan Prefecture, Xinjiang, China

The Turpan Depression, nestled at the foot of China's Bogda Mountains, is a strange mix of salt lakes and sand dunes, and is one of the few places in the world that lies below sea level.

Get the weather forecast for Aqqikkol, China

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Malaspina Glacier, Alaska, USA

The tongue of the Malaspina Glacier, the largest glacier in Alaska, fills most of this image. The Malaspina lies west of Yakutat Bay and covers 1,500 sq mi (3,880 sq km).

Get the weather forecast for Alaska, USA

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Norway

Like dark fingers, cold ocean waters reach deeply into the mountainous coastline of northern Norway, defining the fjords for which the country is famous. Flanked by snow-capped peaks, some of these ice-sculpted fjords are hundreds of meters deep.

Get the weather forecast for Hoddevik, Norway

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Netherlands

Along the southern coast of the Netherlands, sediment-laden rivers have created a massive delta of islands and waterways in the gaps between coastal dunes. After unusually severe spring tides devastated this region in 1953, the Dutch built an elaborate system of dikes, canals, dams, bridges, and locks to hold back the North Sea.

Get the weather forecast for Brouwersdam, Netherlands

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Siberia, Russia

The Mayn River, seen here with what is thought to be a portion of the Anadyr River, flows through the far northeastern corner of Siberia.

Get the weather forecast for Novosibirsk, Russia

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Greenland

Along the southeastern coast of Greenland, an intricate network of fjords funnels glacial ice to the Atlantic Ocean. During the summer melting season, newly calved icebergs join slabs of sea ice and older, weathered bergs in an offshore slurry that the southward-flowing East Greenland Current sometimes swirls into stunning shapes. Exposed rock of mountain peaks, tinted red in this image, hints at a hidden landscape.

Get the weather forecast for Ilulissat, Greenland

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Volcán de Colima, Jalisco, Mexico

Snow-capped Colima Volcano, the most active volcano in Mexico, rises abruptly from the surrounding landscape in the state of Jalisco. Colima is actually a melding of two volcanoes, the older Nevado de Colima to the north and the younger, historically active Volcan de Colima to the south. Legend has it that gods sit atop the volcano on thrones of fire and ice.

Get the weather forecast for Jalisco, Mexico

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Foxe Basin, Nunavut, Canada

Like distant galaxies amid clouds of interstellar dust, chunks of sea ice drift through graceful swirls of grease ice in the frigid waters of Foxe Basin near Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Sea ice often begins as grease ice, a soupy slick of tiny ice crystals on the ocean's surface. As the temperature drops, grease ice thickens and coalesces into slabs of more solid ice.

Get the weather forecast for Salliq, Canada

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Egypt

In a remote part of the Western Desert in central Egypt, highly eroded plateaus rise from the desert floor. The bright speckles are ancient dry lakes, the salt deposits reflecting brightly. Long ago, water flowed off the plateau, forming the breaches seen on the plateaus’ edges. This desolate land between oases is surrounded by extensive sand dunes.

Get the weather forecast for Hurgada, Egypt

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Jordan

Meandering wadis combine to form dense, branching networks across the stark, arid landscape of southeastern Jordan. The Arabic word "wadi" means a gulley or streambed that typically remains dry except after drenching, seasonal rains.

Get the weather forecast for Amman, Jordan

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Painted Desert, Arizona, USA

In the American Southwest, transitions from one ecosystem to another can be dramatic and abrupt. This certainly is true in northern Arizona, USA, where the parched Painted Desert, shown here in a palette of purples, adjoins Sitgreaves National Forest (shades of green), a realm of pine woodlands with abundant wildlife. Within the Painted Desert lie the Hopi Buttes, a field of ancient volcanic cones, seen here as a scattering of dark, circular shapes near the top of the image.

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The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Mississippi, USA

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the graceful swirls and whorls of the Mississippi River. Countless oxbow lakes and cutoffs accompany the meandering river south of Memphis, Tennessee, on the border between Arkansas and Mississippi, USA. The "mighty Mississippi" is the largest river system in North America.

Get the weather forecast for Mississippi, United States

The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

Lambert Glacier, Antarctica

The Lambert Glacier in Antarctica is the world's largest glacier. The focal point of this image is an icefall that feeds into the glacier from the vast ice sheet covering the polar plateau. Ice flows like water, albeit much more slowly. Cracks can be seen in this icefall as it bends and twists on its slow-motion descent 1300 feet (400 meters) to the glacier below.

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The United States Geological Survey / Unsplash

 

Text: Ivan Kuznetsov, USGS

Cover photo: Trevor Mckinnon / Unsplash

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